Tag Archives: Photography

S.D.N.Y. Holds that Publishers May Embed Content Publicly Posted on Instagram Platform — (Sinclair v. Ziff Davis, LLC et al.)

By Lindsay Edelstein

Since the emergence of social media, courts, content creators, and publishers alike have been grappling with legal issues concerning the practice of “embedding” copyrighted content.  Following the controversial February 2019 decision in Goldman v. Breitbart News, LLC – rejecting the Ninth Circuit’s “server test” and holding that an embed constitutes a “public display” exposing a content user to liability under the Copyright Act – the pendulum had seemingly swung in favor of content owners, creators, and licensors. 

Yesterday, however, Judge Kimba Wood of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, issued a ruling in Sinclair v. Ziff Davis, LLC et al, providing publishers and other content users with a defense to alleged copyright infringement premised on the practice of embedding in the context of social media platforms: a valid sublicense granted to the user by Instagram via the interrelated agreements available on its platform. 

Sinclair, a professional photographer, publicly shared her copyrighted photograph “Child, Bride, Mother/Child Marriage in Guatemala” on her public Instagram page, which was viewable by anyone.  Media and entertainment platform Mashable made an offer to license the photograph from Sinclair for use in an article entitled “10 female photojournalists with their lenses on social justice.”  Sinclair rejected Mashable’s offer, but Mashable proceeded to use Instagram’s application programming interface, or “API,” to embed Sinclair’s original Instagram post in its article.  The embed frame of Sinclair’s Instagram post, as it appeared in the Mashable article, was hosted on Instagram’s servers, linked back to Sinclair’s Instagram page, and included the photograph, Sinclair’s original caption, and the date of the original post.  The Mashable article specifically discussed Sinclair and her work above the embed.  Sinclair filed suit against both Mashable and its parent company Ziff Davis, LLC for copyright infringement.

Mashable’s chief argument was that Instagram’s integrated agreements (i.e., its Platform Policy, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy) clearly granted it a sublicense to display the photograph.  Indeed, the Terms of Use stated that, by posting content to Instagram, the user “grant[s] to Instagram a non-exclusive, fully paid and royalty-free, transferable, sub-licensable, worldwide license to the Content that you post on or through [Instagram], subject to [Instagram’s] Privacy Policy.”  Pursuant to Instagram’s Privacy Policy, users can revoke Instagram’s sub-licensable right by designating the content at issue as “private.”  Because Sinclair posted the photograph publicly, Judge Wood opined, “Plaintiff made her choice.  This Court cannot release her from the agreement she made.” 

While the Court conceded that Instagram’s integrated agreements could be more concise and accessible, it declined to accept Sinclair’s contention that the agreements were unenforceable because they were purportedly “circular,” “incomprehensible,” and “contradictory.”

Judge Wood also touched upon a real dilemma faced by professional photographers: deciding whether to remain in “private mode” on one of the most popular public photo sharing platforms in the world, or to promote and share work publicly.  On the one hand, sharing content publicly allows widespread exposure and can be effectively used to market and promote one’s work.  Indeed, many photographers today use Instagram as a digital portfolio, showcasing their works to the masses.  On the other hand, if sharing content publicly grants a valid sublicense to publishers of digital content, the licensing value of such content may be diminished.

This holding is likely to send shock waves throughout the creative community as rights holders may be forced to rethink how they make their works available to the public.  Alternatively, for publishers and media entities, it allows use of publicly available content provided the publisher uses the embed API that links directly back to the Instagram account user’s full Instagram page. 

As with the Goldman case, the Sinclair holding is not binding on other courts and does not create a per se rule with respect to the practice of embedding, and each case will likely depend on the specific circumstances present. In Goldman, the photographer never posted to Twitter, but rather shared his image of Tom Brady in a private Snapchat, with one friend capturing a screen grab and further distributing it on the Twitter platform.  Twitter’s terms, unlike Instagram’s, do not grant publishers a sublicense to embed using the Twitter environment.  Users of content should note that the Instagram Privacy Policy requires the user to obtain consent before using content in an ad.

Moving forward, courts will likely consider the terms of service (including the content owner’s choice of privacy settings) and the type of embedding at issue (i.e., the “framing” of standalone images as in Goldman, versus the prototypical “embedding” using Instagram’s API as in Sinclair).  Courts may also consider the context of the use at issue as well, such as whether the use of the image transformed the purpose of the original work, or whether it is merely illustrative of the article.   Before considering embedding any content, publishers should carefully review all relevant terms of service and seek legal counsel as platform policies are not uniform and there is uncertainty in the law.

Allen v. Cooper: Supreme Court Upholds State Sovereign Immunity in Copyright Row Over State’s Unauthorized Use of Videos and Images of Blackbeard’s Famed Shipwreck

By Lindsay R. Edelstein

In a technical win for states facing federal claims under the Copyright Act, on Monday, March 23, 2020, the United States Supreme Court struck down the Copyright Clarification Act of 1990 (the “CRCA”), which had allowed states to be sued in federal court for copyright infringement.  Allen v. Cooper, No. 18-877, 2020 WL 1325815 (U.S. Mar. 23, 2020).  The Supreme Court, however, did not foreclose the possibility of later abrogating such sovereign immunity, should Congress draft a tailored, constitutional statute addressing infringement by states.  The decision is available here.

The underlying action was brought by videographer Frederick Allen, who was hired by marine salvage company Intersal, Inc. to document the recovery of Queen Anne’s Revenge, a vessel commandeered by Edward Teach (better known as Blackbeard), and shipwrecked nearly 300 years ago off the North Carolina Coast.  Allen registered the copyrights in all his works created during the ten-year excavation with the U.S. Copyright Office, including videos and photographs of guns, anchors, and other remains on the ship.

The state of North Carolina, which had engaged and contracted with Intersal to conduct the recovery efforts but did not have authorization or a license to use certain of Allen’s works, published some of Allen’s photographs and videos online and in a newsletter.  In response to the unauthorized publications, Allen sued the state for copyright infringement in federal district court.

North Carolina moved to dismiss, invoking the doctrine of sovereign immunity, which precludes federal courts from hearing suits brought by individuals against nonconsenting states.  According to Allen, however, the doctrine was abrogated in the copyright context by Congress with its enactment of the CRCA, which provides, in pertinent part, that states “shall not be immune, under the Eleventh Amendment [or] any other doctrine of sovereign immunity, from suit in Federal court” for copyright infringement.  17 U. S. C. § 511(a).  The district court agreed with Allen and denied North Carolina’s motion. 

North Carolina appealed the case to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, which reversed the district court’s ruling, relying heavily on Florida Prepaid Postsecondary Ed. Expense Bd. v. College Savings Bank, 527 U. S. 627 (1999), which had repudiated the Patent and Plant Variety Protection Clarification Act (“Patent Remedy Act”); the Patent Remedy Act was modelled after the CRCA with identical language concerning sovereign immunity. While the district court had conceded that Florida Prepaid precluded Congress from using its Article I powers (the power to “[t]o promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries”) to take away a state’s sovereign immunity, it opined that abrogation of a state’s immunity could still be achieved under Section 5 of the Fourteenth Amendment, which authorizes Congress to “enforce” the commands of the due process clause. 

In reversing the district court’s ruling, the Fourth Circuit cited the requirement that a Section 5 abrogation be “congruent and proportional” to the Fourteenth Amendment injury.  Because the Supreme Court had previously rejected Congress’s attempt, in the Patent Remedy Act, to abolish the states’ immunity in patent infringement suits, the Fourth Circuit held that there was nothing to distinguish the situation in Allen in the context of copyright, which involved a statute with identical language, and related allegations of intellectual property infringement.  

In an opinion authored by Justice Kagan, the Court unanimously sided with the Court of Appeals, holding that “Florida Prepaid all but prewrote our decision today.”  The Court agreed that Article I did not give Congress the authority to enact the CRCA, per the reasoning in Florida Prepaid.  While Allen argued that the Court’s post-Florida Prepaid decision in Cent. Virginia Cmty. Coll. v. Katz, 546 U.S. 356 (2006) – abrogating sovereign immunity with respect to Article I’s bankruptcy clause – changed the analysis, the Court distinguished Katz as “a good-for-one-clause-only holding” that only concerned the bankruptcy clause.  

The Court’s central issue with the CRCA was informed by language found in Section 5 of the Fourteenth Amendment which requires that Congress enforce limitations on states’ authority when they violate due process with “appropriate legislation.”  The word “appropriate” in this context has been interpreted to mean that there must be “a congruence and proportionality between the injury to be prevented or remedied and the means adopted to that end.”  Because, the Court explained, an infringement must be intentional, or at least reckless, to come within the reach of the due process clause, and because the CRCA would impermissibly abrogate states’ sovereign immunity for merely negligent infringement or honest mistakes (which would not violate due process, according to the Court), the CRCA was unconstitutional.  

Allen asserted that the CRCA’s legislative record – namely, a 1988 report by the then-Register of Copyrights arguing that individuals would suffer immediate harm if they were unable to sue infringing states in federal court – was enough to distinguish it from the Patent Remedy Act at issue in Florida Prepaid.  But the Court found the purported evidence of states’ infringement in that legislative record to be unimpressive because, despite undertaking an exhaustive search, the Register only came up with a dozen possible examples of state infringement, some of which were not corroborated.  The CRCA, the Court opined, was enacted to “guard against sloppiness,” not correct constitutional wrongs, and this justification was not sufficient to withstand constitutional scrutiny. 

Significantly, the Court did leave an opening for Congress to pass a valid copyright abrogation law and “effectively stop states from behaving as copyright pirates” or “digital Blackbeards” in the future, if it “appreciate[s] the importance of linking the scope of its abrogation to the redress or prevention of unconstitutional injuries – and of creating a legislative record to back up that connection.”

While the Allen decision certainly sets a limitation on an individual’s ability to prosecute certain copyright claims, it has left the door open for Congress to draft a statute abrogating state sovereign immunity where a state’s infringement is intentional or reckless.  Furthermore, because such a determination is often fact-specific, if such a statute is enacted, federal courts may see an increase in cases filed against states that proceed, at the very least, to the discovery stage.  But for now, copyright owners do not have any recourse against states for copyright infringement, which likely will cause concern to publishers and others in the creative community as to whether state governments will take advantage of the safe passage the Court has provided them at least in the short run.

Copyright Trumps Right of Publicity – Permitting Display and Download of Basketball Photographs (Maloney v. T3Media, Inc.)

The U.S. District Court for the Central District of California in Maloney v. T3Media, Inc. recently held that state right-of-publicity claims brought by former college basketball players complaining of photographs licensed of their likenesses without consent warranted dismissal with prejudice pursuant to California’s anti-SLAPP statute, which prohibits suits aimed at inhibiting free expression.  Members of the 2001 NCAA Division III champion Catholic University basketball team sued T3Media, a cloud storage, hosting, and digital licensing service, alleging violations of their rights of publicity when photographs of the players from the NCAA championship were displayed and made available for licensing on T3Media’s website.

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