Are “#MetaBirkins GONNA MAKE IT”? Hermès, NFTs, and the Rogers Test Collide

There has long been a blurry line at the intersection of trademarks, rights of publicity, and the First Amendment.  Throw in blockchains, NFTs, and high-fashion handbags, and you have a recipe for a final exam-worthy fact pattern perfect for law students versed in Web 3.0. Enter the “MetaBirkins” case.  In this recent headline-grabber, a “marketing

Second Circuit Finds Warhol Artwork of Prince Infringing: Drawing a Line Between Infringing Derivative Works and Transformative Fair Use with Appropriation Art

Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. v. Goldsmith, 992 F.3d 99 (2d Cir.), opinion withdrawn and superseded on reh’g sub nom. Andy Warhol Found. for Visual Arts, Inc. v. Goldsmith, 11 F.4th 26 (2d Cir. 2021) The Second Circuit recently upheld its earlier March 26 decision in Warhol v. Goldsmith, following the recent Supreme Court

Navigating NFTs: Considering Best Practices and Avoiding Pitfalls

All of a sudden, no one can talk about anything but NFTs!  For those people who have used up all of their tech tolerance on Zoom meetings this year, understanding this latest frenzy can seem like an insurmountable task.  But FOMO tends to be very motivational!  Given that the value of the crypto art market

Second Circuit Limits Copyright Damages to Three-Year Period Before Suit

How do you square Psihoyos with Petrella, two of the most significant copyright statute of limitations cases in recent years?  Courts and attorneys alike have struggled with that question since the Second Circuit and the Supreme Court, respectively, handed down these two copyright decisions within the span of a month in 2014.  For the most

Content in Quarantine: Copyright Best Practices During a Pandemic

At a time when we are stuck at home, working or “working” (or, sadly for many, not working) the tenet that content is king has never been more relevant.  From Disney+ releasing “Frozen II” and “Onward” early to help placate restless youngsters, to DreamWorks releasing “Trolls World Tour” for “theatrical” in-house rental, to Instagram sensation

CDAS IP Group and Partner Nancy Wolff Recognized in Chambers USA 2020

The highly regarded “Guide to the Top Lawyers and Law Firms” described CDAS as a “highly skilled boutique offering excellent capabilities handling trademark and copyright infringement cases, as well as substantial portfolio management matters. [CDAS] exhibits expertise acting for market-leading entertainment, media and digital platform clients.” In addition to recognizing the firm for Intellectual Property:

Nancy Wolff Featured in ABA Grassroots Initiative Discussing the CASE Act

As part of ABA Day, Nancy participated in a CASE Act Introduction and discussed implications of The Copyright Alternative in Small-Claims Enforcement (CASE) Act of 2019 and its creation of the Copyright Claims Board as an alternative forum to pursue low-value claims of $30,000 or less. Listen to the panel here.

S.D.N.Y. Holds that Publishers May Embed Content Publicly Posted on Instagram Platform — (Sinclair v. Ziff Davis, LLC et al.)

Since the emergence of social media, courts, content creators, and publishers alike have been grappling with legal issues concerning the practice of “embedding” copyrighted content.  Following the controversial February 2019 decision in Goldman v. Breitbart News, LLC – rejecting the Ninth Circuit’s “server test” and holding that an embed constitutes a “public display” exposing a

Allen v. Cooper: Supreme Court Upholds State Sovereign Immunity in Copyright Row Over State’s Unauthorized Use of Videos and Images of Blackbeard’s Famed Shipwreck

In a technical win for states facing federal claims under the Copyright Act, on Monday, March 23, 2020, the United States Supreme Court struck down the Copyright Clarification Act of 1990 (the “CRCA”), which had allowed states to be sued in federal court for copyright infringement.  Allen v. Cooper, No. 18-877, 2020 WL 1325815 (U.S.

Contractual Disruptions: How They Arise and How to Prepare

With the recent spread of the novel coronavirus COVID-19 and its unprecedented precipitation of social-distancing, work-from-home policies, shelter-in-place orders, and limitations on foreign travel, many individuals may be questioning whether certain contractual obligations are excused. This article provides a primer on the contract concepts of force majeure, impossibility and impracticability, and related provisions that affect,