Tag Archives: Digital Media

CDAS’ Nancy Wolff Examines the “Anatomy of an Ad” at the Cardozo Advertising Law Symposium

Join Nancy and other legal and advertising experts as they put advertising under a microscope, taking an in-depth view of the deals, the laws, the risks and the trends in today’s “ad biz.” Register here for the March 23rd event at the Cardozo School of Law.

CDAS Named a Top Tier Firm, Nationally, for Entertainment Law and Trademark Law in U.S. News – Best Lawyers® “Best Law Firms in America 2020,” and achieved High Rankings in Copyright and Media Law

CDAS achieved a Tier 1 ranking nationally for Entertainment Law – Motion Pictures & Television as well as Trademark Law. The firm was also ranked nationally in Tier 2 for Copyright Law. Within New York City, CDAS was ranked in Tier 1 for Entertainment Law – Motion Pictures & Television, Copyright Law and Trademark Law, and in Tier 3 for Media Law.

These competitive rankings are based on extensive client and peer review, focused on practice group expertise, responsiveness, understanding of business needs, cost-effectiveness, and other important parameters. Inclusion in “Best Law Firms” is considered a significant achievement.

Toto Can’t “Hold the Line”: Sony Prevails in Digital Royalty Dispute with Classic Rockers

Toto, Inc. v. Sony Music Entertainment, No. 12-cv-1434 (RJS) (S.D.N.Y. 2014)

A New York federal judge recently ruled in favor of Sony Music Entertainment (“SME”) in the latest dispute over the proper characterization of artist royalties on digital music sales, dismissing a breach of contract claim brought by rock group Toto (best known for the hits “Africa” and “Rosanna”). Ever since the Ninth Circuit’s 2010 decision in favor of Eminem’s former production company in FBT Productions LLC v. Aftermath Records, artists such as Toto – whose recording contracts predated digital music sales – have taken to the courts arguing that they were underpaid on digital record royalties. Toto’s claims, like FBT’s and many other plaintiffs’ claims, focus on whether, under recording contracts, digital purchases are “sales” as opposed to higher-paying “licenses” or “leases.” Continue reading