Litigation

CDAS Partner Eleanor M. Lackman Selected to The National Law Journal’s Elite Boutique Trailblazers 2018 List

Eleanor M. Lackman

 

CDAS LLP is pleased to announce that partner Eleanor M. Lackman has been selected to The National Law Journal’s “2018 Elite Boutique Trailblazers” list. The list recognizes outstanding attorneys and firms nationwide who have made a remarkable difference in their area of specialized law. Only 29 attorneys from 25 firms were selected for inclusion in 2018 list.

Click here to review the complete list.

 

 

The Good, the Bad, and the JPEG Staying Safe in the Constant Showdown over Digital Content Use Online

The ABA Section of Intellectual Property Law’s magazine Landslide published Scott J. Sholder and Lindsay R. Edelstein’s article “The Good, the Bad, and the JPEG Staying Safe in the Constant Showdown over Digital Content Use Online.”

The article is a how-to guide to prevent and defend against copyright troll claims. View Article

 

 

Scott J. Sholder Named a 2018 Law360 Rising Star for Media and Entertainment

Cowan DeBaets, Abrahams and Sheppard LLP attorney Scott J. Sholder has been named a Law360 Rising Star. A Partner at the firm, Mr. Sholder is among one of 168 attorneys included in the full list and one of only 4 attorneys recognized for their dedicated work in the practice area of Media and Entertainment.

Law360’s “Rising Stars” recognition is reserved for top legal talent under 40 years of age and “whose legal accomplishments transcend their age.”  After carefully reviewing more than 1,200 submissions for the Rising Star distinction, Law360’s team of editors arrived at the list of attorneys under 40 hailing from 80 law firms and spanning 36 practice areas.

To review the complete list, click here.  Profiles of the winners will begin running this week on Law360.

 

 

Lundin v. Discovery Communications: Even in Reality TV Context, Parties Can’t Contract Away Liability Based on Intentional Harms

The U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona in Lundin v. Discovery Communications ruled that a defamation suit brought by a reality television star against the network and producers of a reality show was not barred simply by virtue of an exculpatory “Assumption of Risk” provision containing a waiver of all claims.  Significantly, the ruling stands for the proposition that there is no special exception for reality television or documentary programming which would bar intentional tort lawsuits.  This decision could have potentially significant implications in the reality television sector, as many reality stars may now have recourse for the oft-cited “bad edit.”

The agreement at issue was entered into by Cody Lundin – an internationally recognized professional survival instructor, best-selling author, and survival and sustainability consultant for national and international news outlets – in connection with his appearance on Discovery Channel’s “Dual Survival.”  Lundin served as the show’s on-camera host, wilderness survival expert, and consultant.  The show features a pair of survival experts in predetermined scenarios set in challenging environments.  For instance, Lundin and his co-hosts have been marooned on an island, lost in a jungle, and stranded in the desert, all with minimal survival gear. Continue reading

Chambers USA 2018 Ranks Partners Lackman and Wolff as Top IP Attorneys; Recognizes Two Cowan, DeBaets, Abrahams & Sheppard LLP (CDAS) Practice Groups

Cowan, DeBaets, Abrahams & Sheppard LLP is delighted to announce that partners Eleanor M. Lackman and Nancy E. Wolff and both CDAS’s Entertainment and IP, Copyright and Litigation Practices have been recognized by Chambers and Partners in the Chambers USA 2018: America’s Leading Lawyers for Business guide.

Eleanor M. Lackman

Nancy E. Wolff

This is the fifth consecutive year Ms. Lackman and the second consecutive year Ms. Wolff have been ranked in the Chambers USA guide. They are both among just 41 New York lawyers ranked in the field of “Intellectual Property: Trademark, Copyright & Trade Secrets – New York.”

“Impressed sources” told Chambers that Ms. Lackman is “an absolutely incredible trademark litigator” and added: “She is very practical and always seems to make the right call.” She also has notable experience handling copyright matters, often advising clients across the media and entertainment industries.

Chambers describes Ms. Wolff as “very well-known and well-respected.” She receives plaudits for her expertise in a range of complex copyright matters and is highlighted for her particular skill across the photography and visual art industry.

CDAS’s Entertainment Practice was awarded a regional designation of “Noted Firm” in “Media & Entertainment: Film, Music, Television & Theater – New York” for the third consecutive year, while the Firm’s IP, Copyright and Litigation Practice received a  “Noted Firm” designation in “Intellectual Property: Trademark, Copyright & Trade Secrets – New York” for the second consecutive year.

The annual guide ranks law firms and lawyers based on in-depth interviews with clients and lawyers, technical legal ability, professional conduct, client service, commercial astuteness, diligence, commitment, and other qualities most valued by the client.

The de Havilland v. FX Networks, LLC Appeal: Round 2 Goes to FX

On Monday a California appeals court handed down a decision in the closely watched case of de Havilland v. FX Networks, LLC et al., triggering a collective sigh of relief from studios, networks, and other content producers. The court’s decision reaffirms two widely recognized principles: (1) that the First Amendment’s protection of creative works is not limited by the mere fact that a work generates income, and (2) that an individual cannot censor the way in which she is depicted in a creative work merely because she does not like that depiction.

These principles, as applied to the entertainment industry, have been challenged in recent years with a wave of cases such as de Havilland.  For instance, a case in New York, Porco v. Lifetime Entertainment Services, LLC, was allowed to proceed after an appellate court held that the newsworthiness exception to New York’s statutory right of publicity did not apply to a docudrama that substantially fictionalized the life story of a real person.  The court stated that such a work was “mainly a product of the imagination” and thus “nothing more than [an] attempt[] to trade on the persona of the plaintiff.” Continue reading

Goldman v. Breitbart News, LLC: The Embedding Balance Has Tipped

Update to November 17, 2017 Post.

Last week, Judge Forrest of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York in Goldman v. Breitbart News, LLC – one of a pair of cases pending in Manhattan federal court concerning the practice of “embedding” copyrighted content – issued a ruling in favor of the plaintiff, photographer Justin Goldman, holding that embedding (or framing) does not immunize content users from copyright infringement claims.  The court declined to adopt the Ninth Circuit’s “server test” as set forth in Amazon v. Perfect 10, holding that the location of the allegedly infringed work does not determine whether a defendant has “publicly displayed’ that work in violation of the copyright owner’s exclusive rights.  Put another way, “the fact that the image was hosted on a server owned and operated by an unrelated third party . . . does not shield” defendants from a finding that a plaintiff’s display right had been violated.

The court chiefly relied on the language of the Copyright Act, including § 101’s definition of “display,” which includes showing a copy of a work by any “device or process,” and transmitting or communicating a display by means of any “device or process.”  The court explained that the Copyright Act does not require a user to possess, or to store at their own physical location, a copy of the work in order to display it within the meaning of the statute.  The court further looked to legislative history and the 2014 decision in Aereo to note the application of the Copyright Act to new technologies.   Continue reading

The Ninth Circuit Affirms Significant Legal Victory for Fox, Allowing Hit Television Series Empire to Continue Producing Show and Merchandise over Record Label Empire Distribution’s Objections

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit recently affirmed a lower court’s holding that Fox’s use of the name “Empire” for its hit television series is protected by the First Amendment, leaving record label Empire Distribution without any recourse on its trademark infringement claims.  A copy of the full decision is available here.  Of most significance is the court’s arguable expansion of the Rogers v. Grimaldi test for expressive use of trademarks into the realm of promotion and merchandise.

Empire Distribution, founded in 2010, records and releases albums in the genres of hip hop, rap, reggae, and R&B under the name “Empire.”  Its portfolio of artists includes Snoop Dog, T.I., and Kendrick Lamar.  In 2015, Fox premiered its Empire television show, a drama that centers on a fictional New York-based hip hop music and entertainment company called “Empire Entertainment.”  The Empire show features songs and original music, which Fox releases through Columbia Records after the episode airs, and packages as soundtrack albums at the end of each season – of which there have been four and counting. Continue reading

#FyreFestival, the Music Festival that Never Was

Fyre Festival Goers Sue Organizers over Luxury Music Festival Turned Nightmare Weekend

Fyre festival, vigorously promoted by “social media influencers” such as Kendall Jenner, Gigi Hadid, and Emily Ratajkowski as a “luxury” music festival with tickets ranging in price from $1,200 to over $100,000 per person, was scheduled to take place over two weekends in April and two weekends in May on the “private” Bahamian island of Great Exuma.  Unfortunately, the festival was not nearly what its promoters were touting: it ended up being, what some described as, a “post-apocalyptic nightmare” resembling a chapter out of the “Lord of the Flies.” The story of Fyre Festival blew up in the press this spring, and is now lighting up the federal court system.

Continue reading

Client Alert: Copyright Office Amends DMCA Designated Agent Rule – May 10, 2017

Earlier today, the U.S. Copyright Office issued a new release of its electronic system used to designate and search for Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) agents.

Under the DMCA, a qualified online service provider (OSP) is not liable for copyright infringement with respect to infringing material residing on the OSP’s network if, upon notification of a claimed infringement, the OSP acts expeditiously to remove, or disable access to, the material. One of the prerequisites to receiving this statutory “safe harbor” protection is that OSPs must designate an agent to receive notifications of claimed infringement. The OSP must supply its agent’s contact information to the Copyright Office; in turn, the DMCA instructs the Register of Copyrights to maintain a publicly available, current directory of agents. Continue reading

1 2 3 7